Death is political

We all know that the year of Our Lord 2017 has been quite hysterical, to say the least. It has not slowed down as the year itself has started winding down. It has been weird, stressful, and irritating. It has not gotten any better with the latest absurd faux outrage. What exactly am I rambling about? Well, you see this week we found out that the Senate’s version of the tax cut bill that they are trying to pass so badly is going to kill even more people than we initially thought. That sounds absolutely horrifying, doesn’t it? I don’t want anybody to die.

As it turns out this Senate tax relief bill would slash rates in various alcohol taxes along with everything else. As a result, up to three thousand people could die from this measure alone. Can you imagine such a tragedy? By relieving the taxes on the production and consumption of alcohol the Republican Party is going to literally take three thousand people and drown them in casks. That can’t possibly be right, can it? The simple answer is, of course, it can’t be right. It should be blatantly obvious that this can’t be right, and this is where we get into what’s motivating my writing today. The Democratic Party this year has tripled down a rhetorical point that Republican policies are going to directly kill people and I can’t even describe how this is grating on my nerves.

Death is the most tragic and least understandable part of the human condition. I do not truly wish death upon even my very worst enemies. It snuffs out the complex beauty of human life and leads to nothing but grief in the hearts of the loved ones. It is serious and should be taken with the utmost gravity at all times. This Democratic obsession with drawing every possible tenuous connection to every possible death resulting from a Republican policy is a horrible, horrible trend that we should not under any circumstances be encouraging.  The Red Team is not killing people with their alcohol tax policy. Do not let anyone tell you otherwise, ever.

To take a life is one of the most serious things a person can do. It is nothing to say lightly, and even when completely necessary like in self-defense still a last resort. This is why war is such a horror. This is why we shouldn’t allow people to make these accusations so lightly.

Now even if all of the above weren’t true there are two further problems beyond just their exploitation of the greatest human tragedy. The first further flaw is a matter of scale. Even if the Republican directly strangled three thousand people to pass this specific policy it would come out to something like 0.0009 percent of the united states population. This wouldn’t be all at once either. It is marketed as unacceptable and directly enabling the death of people is twisted and immoral. However, it is worth noting when you see this kind of outrage marketing just what the real impact is of these claims that people will make. Scaling of policy is something that must always be recognized and established.

The other great flaw in all of this is the denial of a personal agency on part of the Democrats. By laying this blame solely on Red Team lawmakers it absolves people of their own role in this. It is always up to you if you take the drink or not. You can incentivize an action or try to disincentivize it as much as you might like but choice always resides in the individual.

So in summation, there are three big problems here. Accusations of murder or at least the responsibility for death should never ever be leveled so lightly. If we must have government regulation and taxation policies, then the scale of them must always be accounted for. Finally, never remove a person’s own agency from their choices, self-ownership is serious business.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: